I was asked to comment on BBC Radio London this week about  the new piece of research that has revealed that 90 per cent of parents still think there are problems with the way some companies market their products to kids.

CIPR director of policy and communications Phil Morgan said, ‘It’s important PR people are aware of the need to have guidelines for communicating with children, particularly with things like social media and peer to peer marketing.’

Most parents remain concerned about the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood a year after an independent review of the pressures on children growing up, a study finds.

Nine in 10 parents (90 per cent) still think there are problems with the way some companies advertise to children and 85 per cent are unaware of the dedicated complaints and advice website ParentPort, according to a poll for the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM).

The survey comes a year after the report by Mothers’ Union chief executive Reg Bailey, entitled Letting Children Be Children, which called on businesses and broadcasters to play their part in protecting young people from the “increasingly sexualised wallpaper surrounding them.”

It seems we are  most concerned about sexually explicit outdoor advertising, marketing during children’s TV programmes and inappropriate products for children, such as padded bras, the poll says.

Targeting children on Facebook and in stores are other significant concerns and this week i asked you what you think of opening up Facebook to under 13’s

Is it a good idea for Facebook to make it easier for kids under 13 to join in?

How do you talk and teach your kids about the influence of the media?

How do you handle “pester power?”